Church Management Roundup: 8.18.14
Five trends, tips, ideas, and stats to help church leaders manage well this week.
Church Management Roundup: 8.18.14

1. Church budgets underscore the value of people. “Salaries and benefits remain the top expense for churches, regardless of size. On average, 47 percent of a church's budget pays pastors and staff. In other church budget surveys conducted by the Church Law & Tax Group and its predecessors dating back to 1999, personnel costs have consistently ranked first among all budget expenses. In one respect, this trend makes sense and underscores the value of people to the local church. The preaching, teaching, and administration necessary for an American church today invariably involves the work of individuals who are specially trained and called. In another respect, though, this trend again will prompt some people to ask healthy questions about the roles of the laity” (“How Churches Spend Their Money,” ChurchLawAndTax.com).

2. Greet today—don’t seize it. “To greet the day, rather than attempting to seize it, is an act of humility. To recognize it as a gift. To acknowledge at sunrise that I cannot take for granted seeing the sunset. I am a steward of the day, not its owner. I thank God for a day to do ministry, to love my congregation, to study the Scriptures, to lead and teach and pastor with diligence and joy. I embrace my finitude. I confess my sin. I ask for strength (“What to Do with a Day,” by John Ortberg, LeadershipJournal.net).

3. Energize your meetings. “Every meeting organizer wants people to attend, pay attention, and participate. Assigning attendees a specific role is a good way to accomplish all of this. Before your next meeting, consider appointing:

  • A facilitator to guide the group;
  • A scribe to capture any key points, ideas, and decisions;
  • A contributor to offer ideas and help keep the discussion on track. Tell the person you’re counting on him to ensure that all the key issues are addressed;
  • An expert to share knowledge on particular issues

(Adapted from “Running Meetings (20-Minute Manager Series),” hbr.org).

4. Don’t hold back in the feedback. “Karen Shellenback from Bersin by Deloitte [says] that based on current projections, 70 percent of the workforce will be Millennials by the year 2025. That is a sobering statistic and means many standard business practices will need to be re-evaluated. Specifically, in the realm of giving feedback. As a common practice, organizations tend to give employees feedback during performance reviews. Millennials, according to Shellenback, crave feedback at least 4 times a week. If 70 percent of the workforce [will] want more than 100 times the current model, most organizations will have to take a really hard look at their current practices” (“It’s About the Employees: 3 Key Takeaways from the Employee Engagement Conference,” by Kyle McCurdy and Stacey Engle, fierceinc.com).

5. Notable quote: “Take the first step in faith. You don’t have to see the whole staircase. Just take the first step.” —Martin Luther King Jr.

This content is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is published with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional service. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought. "From a Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations

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