Monday Church Management Roundup: 3/10/14
Five trends, tips, ideas, and stats to help church leaders manage well this week.
  1. New IRS requirement affects many churches. "Any church that has employees, files employment tax returns, or has a bank or brokerage account, must have an 'employer identification number' (EIN). This includes nearly every church in the United States," writes Richard Hammar on ChurchLawAndTax.com. "On November 18, 2013, the IRS adopted an entirely new requirement to address this problem, stating any employer with an EIN must report changes in the identity of its responsible party to the IRS by March 1, 2014, using Form 8822-B." Even after March 1, 2014, Hammar strongly encourages churches to submit a Form 8822-B for past changes to their responsible parties. Also, any future changes of a church's responsible party should be communicated by filing a Form 8822-B within 60 days to the IRS ("IRS Form 8822-B: A New Reporting Requirement for Churches," by Richard R. Hammar, ChurchLawAndTax.com).
  2. Stressed by a messy desk. "In an experiment, people who sat by a messy desk that was scattered with papers felt more frustrated and weary and took nearly 10 percent longer to answer questions in a color-and-word-matching task, in comparison with those who were seated by a neatly arranged desk" ("Environmental Disorder Leads to Self-Regulatory Failure," by Boyoun Chae and Rui Zhu, Journal of Consumer Research, ejcr.org).
  3. Your Church needs a sexual harassment policy. "A federal district court in Oklahoma ruled that a church could be sued on the basis of sexual harassment for the conduct of a supervisory employee even though it was not aware of it at the time it occurred. ... It is a 'best practice' for a church with employees to adopt a sexual harassment policy" ("Church Sued for Supervisor's Sexual Harassment," by Richard R. Hammar, ChurchLawAndTax.com).
  4. Feedback is incredibly value–but rarely requested. "'The only way to discover your strengths,' wrote Peter Drucker, 'is through feedback analysis.' No senior leader would dispute this as a logical matter. But nor do they act on it. Most leaders don't really want honest feedback, don't ask for it, and don't get much of it unless it's forced on them. ...
  5. "We have the benefit of rich data thanks to the more than 70,000 individuals who have completed the Leadership Practices Inventory, our 30-item behavioral assessment, over the years. ... Looking across how all observers of leaders have filled it out, one descriptor got the absolute lowest rating—and even across the leaders' own self-assessments it comes out second to lowest. It is this statement: '(He or she) asks for feedback on how his/her actions affect other people's performance'" ("To Get Honest Feedback, Leaders Need to Ask," by Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner, hbr.org).
  6. Dealing well with tough decisions. "All leaders must make tough decisions. It goes with the job. They understand that in certain situations, difficult and timely decisions must be made in the best interests of the entire organization, decisions that require a firmness, authority, and finality that will not please everyone. Extraordinary leaders don't hesitate in such situations. They also know when not to act unilaterally but instead foster collaborative decision-making" ("The 9 Traits that Define Great Leadership," by Peter Economy, Inc.com).

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This content is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is published with the understanding that the publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting, or other professional service. If legal advice or other expert assistance is required, the services of a competent professional person should be sought. "From a Declaration of Principles jointly adopted by a Committee of the American Bar Association and a Committee of Publishers and Associations

Comments

Displaying 1–1 of 1 comments

Chris

March 12, 2014  6:47pm

I am new to church management and we're looking into software like http://churchteams.com and http://bvcms.com - it turns out there are TONS of them. Do you have any suggestions on CMS or should we go with our "gut" (ChurchTeams)?

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