Leading a Holistic Church Staff
Focusing on individual gifts may yield better results.

Charlie couldn't lead the church staff. The harder he tried, the more he failed. With 3,000 people in worship each week, the church seemed healthy. The staff, however, seemed emotionally sick and suffered from high turnover. When people left the church staff, they invariably stepped out of full-time ministry. Former staff members expressed bitterness and unhappiness with how they were treated. Charlie knew his ministry was failing. He couldn't lead and mentor the staff. Charlie couldn't release the staff to each person's potential, fully using their gifts for ministry in the church.

Stories like Charlie's always get our attention, but they don't provide much positive traction for growth.

I spent some time recently talking with some executive pastors of significant churches around the country to discover their best practices for leading staff. What I found surprised me—not the best practices themselves, but the fact that my independent interviews, without any prodding by me, all connected to one common thread: holistic staffs.

Let's look at how these leaders develop and oversee holistic staffs, and the lessons we can learn from them for our own ministries:

Charlie couldn't lead the church staff. The harder he tried, the more he failed. With 3,000 people in worship each week, the church seemed healthy. The staff, however, seemed emotionally sick and suffered from high turnover. When people left the church staff, they invariably stepped out of full-time ministry. Former staff members expressed bitterness and unhappiness with how they were treated. Charlie knew his ministry was failing. He couldn't lead and mentor the staff. Charlie couldn't release the staff to each person's potential, fully using their gifts for ministry in the church.

Stories like Charlie's always get our attention, but they don't provide much positive traction for growth.

I spent some time recently talking with some executive pastors of significant churches around the country to discover their best practices for leading staff. What I found surprised me—not the best practices themselves, but the fact that my independent interviews, without any prodding by me, all connected to one common thread: holistic staffs.

Let's look at how these leaders develop and oversee holistic staffs, and the lessons we can learn from them for our own ministries:

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