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The Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000

Religious organizations provided new protections under a new federal law.

Religious Organizations provided new protections under a New Federal Law

Article summary. A new federal law provides important new protections of religious freedom in the contexts of zoning laws and institutionalized persons. Religious congregations whose religious freedom is burdened by the actions of state or local zoning authorities can sue for damages and attorneys' fees. In addition, the Act protects the exercise of religion by persons who are institutionalized in various state and local facilities, including prisons, hospitals, and retirement homes.

On September 22, 2000, President Clinton signed into law the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act ("RLUIPA" or "the Act"). The Act, which had been enacted by unanimous consent of both the Senate and House of Representatives, addresses two areas where religious freedom has been threatened-land use regulation and persons in ...

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Posted:
  • March 1, 2001

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