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Employment Practices - Part 2

False information provided on an application for employment may constitute grounds for termination.

Key point. False information provided on an application for employment may constitute grounds for termination.

* A Louisiana court ruled that a church-operated school could terminate a teacher who falsely stated on her employment application that she did not consume alcoholic beverages. A woman (Stephanie) submitted an application for employment as a teacher with a church-operated school. On the application she answered "no" to the question, "Do you use alcoholic beverages?" The application specifically stated: "Falsification may be the cause for dismissal." A few weeks later the school offered her a job to serve as one of its middle school teachers, and she signed an employment agreement to serve in that capacity for a two-year term. The employment agreement made it clear that the school was not only an institution of elementary education; it also was a religious ministry and, as ...

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Posted:
  • November 1, 2005

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