Jump directly to the Content

Liability for Ex-Employees

Churches generally cannot be liable for the acts of employees that are committed in their own residences apart from an official church activity, or after the termination of their employment.

Key point. Churches generally cannot be liable for the acts of employees that are committed in their own residences apart from an official church activity, or after the termination of their employment.

* A New York court ruled that a church was not liable for the molestation of a young girl by a church's youth pastor that occurred after his employment was terminated, and in his own home. A minor female was sexually molested by a youth pastor. She sued her church, claiming that it was responsible on the basis of negligent hiring, negligent retention, and negligent supervision for the youth pastor's wrongful acts. A trial court dismissed the lawsuit, and a state appeals court affirmed this ruling. It concluded that the church could not be liable for the youth pastor's acts since he was no longer employed by the church at the time he abused the victim. Further, the court pointed out that the ...

Join now to access this member-only content

Become a Member

Already a member? for full access.

Related Topics:
Posted:
  • September 1, 2007

Related ResourcesVisit Store

Safe Hiring Practices for Churches
Safe Hiring Practices for Churches
Essential items to consider before you bring new clergy or staff on board.
CARES Act and CAA Table
CARES Act and CAA Table
A Side-By-Side Look at COVID-19 Economic Relief
Sample Compensation Report
Sample Compensation Report
A ChurchSalary.com Sample Report for Determining Fair Compensation
Understanding Labor Laws
Understanding Labor Laws
Regulations that pertain to hiring, firing, paying, disciplining, and supervising ministry employees.