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When Two Churches Become One

The legal ins and outs of church mergers, acquisitions, and donations/dissolutions.

Last Reviewed: September 9, 2020
When Two Churches Become One
Image: John M Lund Photography Inc

As economic pressures build, churches of various sizes and types are considering whether their church can—or should—merge with another church, acquire another church, or dissolve their church and donate the assets to another church (collectively referred to herein as "transactions").

These transactions have long been common in the business world, but interest in them has grown rapidly recently within the nonprofit sector. The very phrase "mergers and acquisitions" or the concept of these types of transactions can evoke many different images.

Some may envision a hostile corporate takeover. Others may picture a fluid joining of two distinct bodies of believers and, as a result, becoming one church community. Still others may think of a resource-rich church with declining membership partnering with a vibrant church with few financial resources.

While there are resources ...

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Posted:
  • March 1, 2013
  • Last Reviewed: September 9, 2020

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