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Youth/Children's Worker

Continuing education for ministry leaders
Youth/Children's Worker
Weekly Lessons, created and written by Richard R. Hammar, J.D., LL.M., CPA, give you a basic legal overview of essential topics based on staff or volunteer positions within a church.

This Week's LessonWeek of December 1

What Youth Pastors Should Know about Child Abuse Reporting

Introduction

Pastor Todd is a youth pastor at his church. A 13-year-old girl asks to speak with Pastor Todd following a youth service, and informs him that she is being sexually molested by her stepfather. Pastor Todd prays with her, and decides to handle the matter as a spiritual problem. He is not familiar with the state's child abuse reporting law.

This lesson focuses on the issue of child abuse reporting. You can review the Executive Summary to obtain the key points or read the Weekly Lesson for a more thorough presentation of this topic. Start by completing the following interactive quiz to test your knowledge.

Weekly Quiz

Instructions Click on the correct answer for each of the following questions.

Executive Summary

It is essential for youth pastors to be familiar with child abuse reporting requirements under state law. Unfamiliarity with these requirements can lead to criminal and civil ...

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