Buying Power
Guidance churches can use for buying decisions.
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Eric Guyer was on a mission. The executive pastor of Frontline Church needed to buy 300 new chairs for his downtown Oklahoma City congregation. After conducting research and selecting three vendors to make the first cut, Guyer asked each company to send one chair apiece for a trial run—more accurately, a trial sit.

The trial helped eliminate a poor quality product. "We knew one of the samples would have broken within the first six months," Guyer says. "If we had purchased 300 of these chairs, we wouldn't have been able to return them. But we only bought one and tested it for a week. That ended up being a good deal for us. That's why we don't buy anything in quantity until we've tried it out."

Frontline's "try before you buy" approach is one example of how a church can flex its buying muscle to get the best deal possible and to stretch a purchasing budget that is always limited, especially in difficult economic conditions. Whether your church is buying an item as substantial as a new building or as tiny as a box of plastic spoons, keeping a sharp eye out for the best deal will help guarantee the best stewardship of God's resources.

Posted: March 15, 2010

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