Jump directly to the content

Guiding Bivocational Ministers Through the Tax Maze

Special considerations for ministers who also work outside the church.

Guiding Bivocational Ministers Through the Tax Maze

Vince Stover left a full-time pastor's job in 2014 and moved 250 miles with his wife, Katie, to a city where the couple didn't know a soul. He found a job in insurance sales and planted Bible Pathway Baptist Church in Lexington, Kentucky. The couple started a family, welcoming sons Brett and Camden.

Yet it was the prospect of filing his annual tax return—for the first time as a bivocational pastor—that kept him awake some nights.

"I was scared to death," said Stover, who still pastors Bible Pathway but now sells advertising and programming time for a local radio station. "I had been a pastor before, and we did our taxes ourselves. But I knew there was a lot more involved now." So, he and his wife, Katie, sought help from a qualified accountant.

As a bivocational minister, Stover is far from alone. Around one-third of all pastors have a job outside of ...

Join now to access this member-only content

Become a Member

Already a member? for full access.

Related Topics:
Posted:
  • March 16, 2018

Related ResourcesVisit Store

50-State Public Accommodations Laws Report
50-State Public Accommodations Laws Report
How statutes and court decisions across the country do - or don't affect churches
2021 Church & Clergy Tax Guide (Book)
2021 Church & Clergy Tax Guide (Book)
The most comprehensive and authoritative tax guide available.
Politics and the Church
Politics and the Church
Tax and legal guidelines faith-based organizations need to know before jumping into the political fray.
CARES Act and CAA Table
CARES Act and CAA Table
A Side-By-Side Look at COVID-19 Economic Relief