Recent Developments

Issues that affect ministers and churches
Freedom of Religion - Part 1

Two federal appeals courts addressed the issue of the right of Christian student groups to meet on public high school campuses for Bible study and prayer prior to the start of the school day. One court concluded that such groups have a legal right to meet on public school property, and the other court ruled that they do not. The United States Court of Appeals for the Eight Circuit (which includes the states of Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota) concluded that Christian student groups have a legal right to meet on a public high school campus for Bible study and prayer prior to the start of the school day. The group in question (comprised of students at a Nebraska public high school) had argued that their school's refusal to allow them to meet on school property violated the constitutional guaranty of religious freedom and the federal "Equal Access Act." The Equal Access Act prohibits public high schools from denying any group access to school facilities during "noninstructional" hours on account of the religious content of the group's speech if the school has established a "limited open forum" by making the same facilities available to "one or more noncurriculum related student groups." The Christian group argued that the school had created a limited open forum by permitting several "noncurriculum related groups" to meet on school property (including the chess club, a junior Rotary Club, and a scuba diving club), and accordingly the school could not deny the Christian group access to the same facilities during noninstructional hours. School officials argued that they had not created a limited open forum, since all of the clubs that met on school property were curriculum related. They pointed out that the chess club was related to logic (though no logic courses were taught at the school), the junior Rotary Club was related to sociology, and the scuba diving club was related to physical education. The federal appeals court rejected the school's claim that the Equal Access Act did not apply since all of the student clubs were curriculum related: "Allowing such a broad interpretation of 'curriculum-related' would make the Equal Access Act meaningless. A school's administration could simply declare that it maintains a closed forum and choose which student clubs it wanted to allow by tying the purposes of those student clubs to some broadly defined educational goal. At the same time the administration could arbitrarily deny access to school facilities to any unfavored student club on the basis of its speech content. This is exactly the result that Congress sought to prohibit by enacting the Equal Access Act. A public secondary school cannot simply declare that it maintains a closed forum and then discriminate against a particular student group on the basis of the content of the speech of that group." The court concluded that "many of the student clubs [at the high school in question], including the chess club, are non-curriculum-related" and therefore the school had established a limited open forum and "the Equal Access Act forbids discrimination against [the Christian student group] on the basis of its religious content." The court also rejected the school's claim that the Equal Access Act violated the constitution. The court noted that the United States Supreme Court had ruled in 1981 that a public university could not deny a Christian student group access to university facilities that were available to other student groups. This ruling, concluded the appeals court, demonstrated the validity of the Equal Access Act. The court rejected the school's argument that the Supreme Court's ruling should be limited to university students on account of the greater impressionability and immaturity of high school students. It noted that "Congress considered the difference in the maturity level of secondary students and university students before passing the Equal Access Act. We accept Congress' fact-finding." The ruling is controlling in the eighth federal judicial circuit (which includes the states of Arkansas, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota)—unless reversed or modified by the same court in a later decision, or by the United States Supreme Court. Mergens v. Board of Education of Westside Community Schools, 867 F.2d 1076 (8th Cir. 1989).

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Posted: September 1, 1989
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