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Teacher Seduces High School Student

School found not liable on the basis of negligent supervision.

Minnesota
State:
Key Point. An employer is not liable on the basis of negligent supervision for an employees misconduct that could not have been anticipated or discovered through the normal exercise of reasonable care.

The Minnesota Supreme Court ruled that a school was not liable on the basis of negligent supervision for the sexual seduction of a high school student by a female teacher. The teacher used a counseling relationship with a male student as the basis for a sexual relationship that continued for several months. Most of the sexual encounters occurred during regular school hours on school premises. The victim later sued the school, claiming that it was responsible for his injuries on the basis of negligent supervision. In rejecting the victims claim that the school was guilty of negligent supervision, the court observed:

[The school] performed standard teacher evaluations of [the teacher]. ...

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Posted:
  • July 1, 1997

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