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Recent Developments in Nebraska Regarding Employment Practices

A federal court in Nebraska ruled that an employer violated both state and federal law by dismissing an employee who refused to work on Easter Sunday.

Nebraska
State:
Key point. Employers subject to Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (or a comparable state law) have a legal duty to "accommodate" their employees' religious practices if they can do so without suffering an "undue hardship." In some cases requiring employees to work on a religious holiday against their will may be an unlawful practice.

A federal court in Nebraska ruled that an employer violated both state and federal law by dismissing an employee who refused to work on Easter Sunday. The employee, a devout Christian, was employed by a convenience store chain as a cashier. A previous manager accommodated the employee's desire not to work on Easter Sunday by allowing her to work on non—religious holidays (such as New Year's Day) instead. A new manager was not so accommodating. She scheduled the employee to work the evening shift on Easter Sunday even though she had been fully ...

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Posted:
  • May 1, 1998

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