Jump directly to the Content

Defamation - Part 1

A federal appeals court ruled that a camp director’s false statement that the state had filed a complaint of child abuse against a camp worker was defamatory.

Key point 4-02.03. A number of defenses are available to one accused of defamation. These include truth, statements made in the course of judicial proceedings, consent, and self-defense. In addition, statements made to church members about a matter of common interest to members are protected by a "qualified privilege," meaning that they cannot be defamatory unless they are made with malice. In this context, malice means that the person making the statements knew that they were false or made them with a reckless disregard as to their truth or falsity. This privilege will not apply if the statements are made to nonmembers.
Defamation

* A federal appeals court ruled that a camp director's false statement that the state had filed a complaint of child abuse against a camp worker was defamatory. A man ("Ken") was hired by a summer camp to be its archery teacher. Ken worked for the camp for ...

Join now to access this member-only content

Become a Member

Already a member? for full access.

Related Topics:
Posted:
  • November 3, 2003

Related ResourcesVisit Store

Child Sexual Abuse Response Plan
Child Sexual Abuse Response Plan
Put a plan into action to prevent child sexual abuse from happening in your church.
Sex Offenders in the Church
Sex Offenders in the Church
Legal and safety concerns to address when dealing with a sex offender.
Understanding Pastoral Liability
Understanding Pastoral Liability
Know the situations in which a pastor is personally liable for wrongdoing.
Sexual Harassment in the Christian Workplace - Executive Report 2020
Sexual Harassment in the Christian Workplace - Executive Report 2020
An inside look at the church and parachurch ministries workplace environment survey.