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Child Abuse Reporting

A New York court ruled that the subject of a child abuse report had no legal right to obtain the name of the person who reported the abuse.

New York
State:
Key point 4-08. Every state has a child abuse reporting law that requires persons designated as mandatory reporters to report known or reasonably suspected incidents of child abuse. Ministers are mandatory reporters in many states. Some states exempt ministers from reporting child abuse if they learned of the abuse in the course of a conversation protected by the clergy-penitent privilege. Ministers may face criminal and civil liability for failing to report child abuse.

A New York court ruled that the subject of a child abuse report had no legal right to obtain the name of the person who reported the abuse, despite his claim that he needed the reporter's identity so that he could sue him for filing a false and malicious report.

A public school employee reported a suspected case of child abuse to state authorities. The report identified the suspected perpetrator of the abuse (the plaintiff). ...

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