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Disclosing a Child Abuse Reporter's Identity

Can the state reveal reporting sources?

Can The State Reveal Reporting Sources?

Some church leaders are reluctant to report known or suspected cases of child abuse due to a concern that the state will disclose their identity to the alleged molester. In fact, most state child abuse reporting laws prohibit the disclosure of a reporter's identity to the alleged molester. Some states permit the disclosure of the reporter's identity to other state agencies, or a prosecuting attorney. In addition, many states do not require reporters to divulge their identity. A few states do require mandatory reporters to identity themselves when they report child abuse, but in most of these states the reporting law prohibits the disclosure of the reporter's identity to the alleged molester.

The laws of all 50 states are reviewed in a Table (Table 3) that accompanies this article.

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