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Issues that affect ministers and churches
Removal of Church Board Members
If a church neglects to address an issue in its governing documents, state nonprofit corporation law will provide the answer.

Key point 6-02.2. Churches are subject to the provisions of their governing documents, which generally include a charter and a constitution or bylaws (in some cases both). A charter is the state-approved articles of incorporation of an incorporated church. Most rules of internal church administration are contained in a constitution or bylaws. Specific and temporary matters often are addressed in resolutions. If a conflict develops among these documents, the order of priority generally is as follows—charter, constitution, bylaws, and resolutions.

Key point 6-06.4. Church officers and directors can be removed from office in the manner authorized by the church's governing documents. It is common for church bylaws to give the membership the authority to remove officers and directors who engage in specified misconduct or change their doctrinal position.

A Florida court ruled that state nonprofit corporation law governed the removal of board members in a church that did not address the issue in its governing documents. A pastor and a member of a church's board of directors (the "defendants") attempted to remove the four other members of the board (the "plaintiffs") and replace them with new members. When the ousted board members discovered what had happened, they entered into protracted negotiations to resolve the dispute without recourse to litigation. When that failed, the former board members sued the defendants, alleging breach of contract, breach of fiduciary duty, and fraud. A trial court dismissed the case on the basis of the "ecclesiastical abstention" doctrine which generally bars the civil courts from resolving internal church disputes. The court noted that any attempt on its part to resolve the dispute "would necessarily and excessively entangle this court in doctrinal and theological issues." The plaintiffs appealed.

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