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Supreme Court: Commemorative Cross on Public Land Did Not Offend the Constitution

Bladensburg Cross may remain, both for its religious and secular purposes, majority says.

Supreme Court: Commemorative Cross on Public Land Did Not Offend the Constitution

A hotly contested case involving a large, nearly century-old memorial was decided recently by the United States Supreme Court.

Through a 7-2 decision issued last week, the majority said the location of the cross on public property does not violate the US Constitution. The facts of the case, and the Court’s rationale regarding those facts, are notable for churches and church leaders.

Background

In late 1918, residents of Prince George’s County, Maryland, formed a committee for the purpose of erecting a memorial for the county’s citizens killed in World War I. Among the committee’s members were the mothers of 10 deceased soldiers. The committee decided that the memorial should be a cross and hired a sculptor to design it.

After selecting the design, the committee turned to the task of financing the project. It held fundraising events in the community and invited donations, ...

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Richard R. Hammar is an attorney, CPA and author specializing in legal and tax issues for churches and clergy.

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Posted:
  • June 27, 2019

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