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Recent Developments in New Jersey Regarding Employment Practices

A New Jersey court ruled that a church acted properly in dismissing its music director for criminal acts.

New Jersey
State:
Key point. Churches generally are not liable for sharing truthful references about a former worker when asked to do so by another church.
Key point. Churches generally are not liable on the basis of wrongful termination for dismissing an employee because of criminal behavior.

A New Jersey court ruled that a church acted properly in dismissing its music director for criminal acts. The music director entered into a one—year employment contract with a church in 1994. The contract contained the following provision for termination:

The parties involved shall give notice of termination of employment at least thirty days in advance of the termination. The termination time must be completed by the employee or if the employer does not wish the termination to be completed the employer shall fulfill all contractual financial agreements.

After working for the church for a few months, ...

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Posted:
  • July 1, 1998

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