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Employment Practices - Part 1

A federal appeals court ruled that two men who set fire to a church could not be convicted under a federal arson statute.

Key pointLabor Laws Congress has enacted a number of employment and civil rights laws regulating employers. These laws generally apply only to employers that are engaged in interstate commerce. This is because the legal basis for such laws is the constitutional power of Congress to regulate interstate commerce. As a result, religious organizations that are not engaged in commerce generally are not subject to these laws. In addition, several of these laws require that an employer have a minimum number of employees. The courts have defined "commerce" very broadly, and so many churches will be deemed to be engaged in commerce.

A federal appeals court ruled that two men who set fire to a church could not be convicted under a federal arson statute since there was insufficient evidence that the church was engaged in commerce as required by the law. Two men (the "defendants") broke into the ...

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Posted:
  • July 2, 2001

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