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Copyright

A federal appeals court ruled that books written by a religious leader were not works made for hire and therefore the leader himself was the owner of the copyright in the books.

Key point 9-05.04. Works created by employees within the scope of their employment are "works made for hire." The employer is deemed to be the "author" of such a work, and owns the copyright in it unless it executes a signed writing assigning the copyright back to the employee.
Copyright Law

A federal appeals court ruled that books written by a religious leader were not works made for hire and therefore the leader himself, rather than the organization for which he worked, was the owner of the copyright in the books. A Hindu monk (Yogananda) founded a religious order in the United States in 1935. Until his death in 1952, Yogananda lived in quarters that the order provided and received a small monthly stipend. He served as the order's president and as a member of its board of directors. During these years Yogananda wrote books and articles and gave religious lectures. The lectures were ...

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Posted:
  • March 1, 2001

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