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Immigration

A federal appeals court ruled that the Immigration and Naturalization Service improperly denied a religious organization's application.

Key point. Immigration law permits churches to apply for an immigrant visa for persons qualifying as "religious workers" if certain conditions are satisfied. Such a visa permits the employee to work indefinitely in this country.

* A federal appeals court ruled that the Immigration and Naturalization Service improperly denied a religious organization's application for an immigrant "religious workers" visa for an employee who was in the United States on a temporary nonimmigrant R-1 visa. A religious charity that provided services to young adults with mental disabilities employed a German citizen (Greta) who had been admitted into the United States with an R-1 "nonimmigrant religious worker" visa. Since R-1 visas are limited to 3 years (they can be extended to a total term of 5 years), Greta's employer filed a Form I-360 "immigrant visa petition" with the Immigration and Naturalization ...

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Posted:
  • July 1, 2005

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