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New Best Practices for Protecting Children

Penn State's Freeh report emphasizes building a culture of risk management.

In churches, risk management often falls to one staff member or lay leader. This may occur because of a lack of manpower. Sometimes, it may occur because risk management is viewed as a lower priority than other ministry initiatives.

But as recent headlines suggest, churches may no longer have the ability to keep risk management confined to one person, or as a moderate priority to be addressed as time and resources allow. With increasing attention and scrutiny placed on institutions and organizations for the health and well-being of those entrusted to their care, churches must more effectively demonstrate the measures taken to prevent an incident from taking place.

To not do so may result in serious repercussions, including an incident in which someone is harmed, or in criminal and civil charges stemming from an allegation that could expose the church, its pastor and staff, even its board, ...

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Posted:
  • November 1, 2012

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