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Court Rules Venue Owners Violated Discrimination Laws by Refusing to Host Same-Sex Wedding

Wedding facilities fall comfortably within the broad definition of "place of public accommodation."

Last Reviewed: March 4, 2021
Key point 13-02.1. In the Smith case (1990) the Supreme Court ruled that a neutral law of general applicability is presumably valid and need not be supported by a compelling government interest to be consistent with the First Amendment, even if it interferes with the exercise of religion.
Key point 13-02.2. Congress enacted the Religious Freedom Restoration Act to prevent the government from enacting any law or adopting any practice that substantially burdens the free exercise of religion unless the law or practice is supported by a compelling government interest. The compelling government interest requirement applies to any law, including neutral laws of general applicability. The objective of the Act was to repudiate the Supreme Court's decision in the Smith case (1990) in which the Court ruled that neutral laws of general applicability that burden the free exercise of religion do not ...

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Posted:
  • April 20, 2017
  • Last Reviewed: March 4, 2021

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