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Freedom of Religion - Part 1

A federal court in Texas ruled that a hospital cook could sue his employer for "religious discrimination" as a result of the employer's hostile treatment.

Key point 8-08.3. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits covered employers from discriminating against any employee on account of the employee's religion. Employers are required to "reasonably accommodate" employees' religious practices, so long as they can do so without undue hardship on the conduct of their business. Many state civil rights laws have a similar provision.

The Civil Rights Act of 1964

* A federal court in Texas ruled that a hospital cook could sue his employer for "religious discrimination" as a result of the employer's hostile treatment following the cook's religious conversion. A cook ("Ed") was employed by a public hospital. He experienced a religious conversion and "began to speak about his religious beliefs and the good things the Lord had done in his life since his conversion." Ed was later involved in an automobile ...

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Posted:
  • July 1, 2002

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