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Employment Practices - Part 1

A federal court in the District of Columbia ruled that a religious organization could not be sued by a former employee for religious discrimination, but it could be sued for national origin discrimination.

Key point 8-08.1. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits employers engaged in commerce and having at least 15 employees from discriminating in any employment decision on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, or religion. Religious organizations are exempt from the ban on religious discrimination, but not from the other prohibited forms of discrimination.
The Civil Rights Act of 1964

* A federal court in the District of Columbia ruled that a religious organization could not be sued by a former employee for religious discrimination, but it could be sued for national origin discrimination. A Native American female was employed as an executive secretary by a denominational agency. She was terminated due to insubordination, and sued the agency for religious and national origin discrimination. In particular, she alleged that she had been dismissed on account of her ...

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Posted:
  • November 3, 2003

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