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Refusal to Hire Worker Without Social Security Number Does Not Constitute Religious Discrimination in Federal Case

Federal
State:

A federal appeals court ruled that an employer had not engaged in unlawful religious discrimination by rejecting an applicant for employment on the basis of his refusal, on religious grounds, to have a Social Security number. The applicant (the "plaintiff") sued the employer in a federal district court in Ohio seeking monetary damages and a court order compelling the employer to hire him. The court dismissed the lawsuit, and the plaintiff appealed.

A federal appeals court affirmed the district court's dismissal of the plaintiff's lawsuit. The court applied a two-step analysis in evaluating the legitimacy of the plaintiff's religious discrimination claim:

First, we determine whether [the plaintiff] has established a "prima facie case of religious discrimination," which requires proof that "(1) he holds a sincere religious belief that conflicts with an employment requirement, (2) he has informed ...

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Posted:
  • April 21, 2016

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