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Convicted Sex Offender Sentenced to Five Years for Violating Megan’s Law

This case underscores four vulnerabilities creating risks, including the failure to consistently enforce an abuse-prevention policy.

Key point 10-04.3. Churches can reduce the risk of liability based on negligent selection for the sexual molestation of minors by adopting risk management policies and procedures.

A New Jersey court affirmed a five-year prison sentence for a convicted child molester whose participation in a church’s youth ministry violated Megan’s Law.

A registered sex offender served in a church’s youth ministry

An adult male (the “defendant”) was sentenced to prison for sexually assaulting two teenagers. When he was released, he registered as a sex offender with his local law enforcement agency as required by Megan’s Law.

The defendant was an active member of a church and participated in its No Limits Youth Ministry (NLYM), whose mission was “to prepare students to be effective” at home and in school. Eventually, the defendant became involved in a variety of ...

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Posted:
  • April 8, 2022

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