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Loved and Trusted: What Shocks Us Most About Fraud Perpetrators

A closer look at the men and women who steal from churches—and the red flags leaders should watch for.

Loved and Trusted: What Shocks Us Most About Fraud Perpetrators
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Church Law & Tax’s nationwide survey of congregations and the financial misconduct they experience paints four portraits of the types of individuals who most commonly steal from their churches.

What’s most shocking?

The positions of trust the men and women who commit these crimes carry.

The study revealed that common perpetrators included middle-aged men who served as treasurers or board members, sometimes for upwards of 10 years; men and women in their 30s and 40s who worked in their roles as administrators and treasurers for less than 5 years; and male pastors in their 40s.

And then there’s the group of perpetrators that may be the most surprising of all: men and women, typically 60 or older, who held their positions for 20 years or more. The crimes committed by these individuals “were disproportionately expensive” compared with other offenders, according ...

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Posted:
  • October 1, 2021

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